“Leigh has a broad spectrum of genuine interests in real life that adds depth and diversification to her personality and how she relates to people.”

Get to know me.

First and foremost, I am a professional.  I take my work seriously.  I am here because I am passionate about my work.

That translates to I am here for you. I will listen to you. I am interested to learn how you absorb information (reading, podcasts, books on tape, YouTube, creative arts). I want to learn your style of learning so that you can accomplish your goals and reasons why you contacted me.

You will receive individual personalized care when you work with me.  If we feel I am not the right therapist for you, I will gladly refer you to someone I respect.

Professionally, I decided to become a therapist later in life. I dabbled for many years in odd jobs while I traveled our country camping and exploring. I found myself able to express my passion for the arts through food, pastries, and rustic bread making when I attended college for the culinary arts. Later in life, I gained over a decade of business experience as an employee and the owner of a service oriented business.

Personally, I am a proud mother of three sons. They have gifted me more experiences and joy than I ever thought was possible. I had to learn how to balance career, marriage, and parenting while continually pushing my own personal comfort zones.

The education that has contributed to my current certifications is varied and represents my passions. I am committed to helping others and through my education, I have come to understand the incredible healing power of equine therapy. I believe horses can teach us new ways of being in relationships with ourselves, others, and our larger environment.

My search for effective interventions has also led me toward becoming certified in EMDR therapy (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing). EMDR has been shown to be remarkably effective. I will gain additional knowledge in areas of trauma, attachment theory, leadership, authenticity, trust, compassion and intuition. 

Professional Qualifications

  • Presently attending the certification process of Natural Lifemanship
  • Level 1 Skyhorse Academy Certification
  • Certification in EMDR.
  • Gottman’s Method Couples Training, Level 1 & 2
  • EAGALA Certified, Level 1 & 2
  • 100-hour Children’s Yoga Instructor
  • 200-hour YTT Certified Yoga Instructor
  • Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Florida
  • MS in Master of Social Work, from Barry University in Miami
  • BA in Psychology, from Barry University in Miami
  • AA in Culinary Arts, from Kendall College in Chicago 

Frequently asked questions

Why would I want to talk to a therapist?

People usually decide to talk to a therapist when the pain of what they are trying to cope with becomes too big for them to handle on their own and they recognize they need help.

What happens in a therapy session?? Do I have to lie on a couch?

Lying on a couch is no longer required!? Instead, clients come into an office (that’s usually quite comfortable) and talk to the therapist. Sometimes the therapist will have a plan for what to talk about during that session; at other times, the client drives the conversation.

I’ve found it helps clients to have an idea of what will happen in a session, so I have a basic structure.  The session starts with the client telling me about what has been happening for them since our last meeting.  We check in on any homework that was suggested.  I ask the client if there is anything they want to talk about.  Normally the client has outlined goals for therapy (what they would like to be different when therapy is finished) and that always provides areas for conversations.

This is your therapy, so again, you get to choose!

What should I be looking for?

There are lots of very good therapists out there doing all types of therapy. However, studies show that more important than the type of therapy, the biggest indicator of client success is the therapeutic relationship that develops between the therapist and client. In other words,…there needs to be a ‘good fit’.

If possible, have a phone or email conversation when you first contact a potential therapist.

Ask if this person has experience in helping people to deal with your area of concern. If that goes well, then book a first meeting. You will have to pay for the first session, but it’s money well-spent if you decide that this isn’t the therapist for you. Trust your instincts. Your friend may feel comfortable with their therapist, but that doesn’t mean she’s ‘your’ therapist.

How long will I be in therapy?? Do I have to go forever?

While therapists learn various types of therapies (Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Emotionally Focused Therapy, etc.), therapy is also an art. Every client is different, with different needs for the time they will be seeing a therapist.

Personally, I operate from the perspective of ‘this is your therapy’ and you get to choose.  If a client is in crisis, then I suggest meeting weekly until things become more stable.  Once the crisis is past, we move to bi-weekly or even monthly.  It depends on what the client chooses as well as what is in their best interest therapeutically.

Ethically, a therapist shouldn’t want a client to have to come forever. The overall goal is that people feel better and go back to their lives.

Once clients ‘graduate’ from seeing their therapist, many treat their therapist as one more tool in their health toolbox–checking in when necessary.

What should I be looking for?

There are lots of very good therapists out there doing all types of therapy. However, studies show that more important than the type of therapy, the biggest indicator of client success is the therapeutic relationship that develops between the therapist and client. In other words,…there needs to be a ‘good fit’.

If possible, have a phone or email conversation when you first contact a potential therapist.

Ask if this person has experience in helping people to deal with your area of concern. If that goes well, then book a first meeting. You will have to pay for the first session, but it’s money well-spent if you decide that this isn’t the therapist for you. Trust your instincts. Your friend may feel comfortable with their therapist, but that doesn’t mean she’s ‘your’ therapist.

How long will I be in therapy?? Do I have to go forever?

While therapists learn various types of therapies (Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Emotionally Focused Therapy, etc.), therapy is also an art. Every client is different, with different needs for the time they will be seeing a therapist.

Personally, I operate from the perspective of ‘this is your therapy’ and you get to choose.  If a client is in crisis, then I suggest meeting weekly until things become more stable.  Once the crisis is past, we move to bi-weekly or even monthly.  It depends on what the client chooses as well as what is in their best interest therapeutically.

Ethically, a therapist shouldn’t want a client to have to come forever. The overall goal is that people feel better and go back to their lives.

Once clients ‘graduate’ from seeing their therapist, many treat their therapist as one more tool in their health toolbox–checking in when necessary.